Plum Jam

Ever since I got a taste of canning with the Bread and Butter Pickles I made a few weeks ago, I really can’t get enough. Previously I had always assumed that canning wasn’t for me… It seemed hot, messy, and like more work than it was worth. Though it can be a bit warm in the kitchen and I have been known to make giant messes in the kitchen, I have found the process to be quite enjoyable… And definitely worth the effort (and it’s really not that much effort).

I’ve also recently discovered a local farmers’ market that is just down the street from my house. Many of the vendors are farmers who have either organic or naturally grown fruits, vegetables, and even meats.  So, I’ve been able to supplement my CSA (which is primarily all veggies) with some beautiful fruit.  Last week I came across some deep red plums that almost looked like cherries. When I saw them, I knew they’d be perfect for some jam, so I stocked up on quite a few!

For now, I’m still sticking to “tried and true” canning recipes because I still have horrible visions of poisoning friends and family if I try something new.  So, this recipe for plum jam came on the insert in my box of Ball Fruit Pectin.  It’s pretty basic and turned out beautifully for me… If you want to start canning, I think this would be a great place to start!

Plum Jam

Makes about 9 half-pint jars

(from Ball Fruit Pectin insert)

  • 6 cups plums, pitted and chopped
    (for the small plums, my cherry pitter worked beautifully to remove the pits)
  • 1/2 cup water
  • 1 box (1.75 ounces) Ball Original Fruit Pectin
  • 8 cups sugar

Wash your jars and lids and then transfer them to hot, almost boiling water until you are ready to fill them.

Combine the chopped plums and the water in a large pot and simmer for about 5 minutes.

Over high heat, gradually stir in the pectin and bring the mixture to a rolling boil that cannot be stirred down.  While stirring constantly, add the sugar.  Once the sugar has dissolved, bring the mixture back to a boil and boil for 1 minute.

Remove the jam from the heat and carefully ladle the hot liquid into the hot jars. Wipe the rim of the jar before fitting it with the lid and band.  Process the jars in boiling water for 10 minutes.

Note: If you have extra jam left over, you can transfer it to an airtight container and keep it in the fridge!

15 Responses to Plum Jam

  1. Eliana says:

    Looks gorgeous and so delicious Jen.

  2. I wonder if I could try it with pluots! I have had some delicious pluots this year – more than usual. Very sweet and succulent.

  3. Mags says:

    Beautiful looking jam! I made some freezer jam last week (with Splenda) but that’s as far as I go in the jam making department.

  4. Gail says:

    I love jams and jellies. And plums!!!!
    You are fearless in the kitchen, a trait I truly admire.

  5. i had a ton of shiro plums (yellow plums) from my fruit tree, but i either ate them or gave it away to family & friends. i should be selfish next time and squirrel it away in the form of a jam, like this! then i can have my lovely plums all year round… *sigh* too late now.

  6. Wow – I love your photo of the plums! Beautiful.

    I’m hoping to do some canning over the next few weeks. Definitely bookmarking this recipe! :)

  7. Nutmeg Nanny says:

    Don’t worry about poisoning anyone unless a seal pops. Then throw that sucker away! Don’t even try to test it. Then you would get sick. Sorry didn’t mean to sound all “public service announcement” but I grew up canning. I’m pretty sure we canned everything! Jam, jelly, hot sauce, bbq sauce, pickles, tomatoes….the list goes on and on.

    Ok enough about me and onto this delicious looking jam. I love that fact that you used plums. They are some of my favorite fruit and they are all over the markets. I need to give this a try.

    Now I’m craving plums…..

    • Drew says:

      Please take this post with caution. You MUST check with your county co-op to see what can be canned with a hot water bath and what can’t. Her list contains BOTH!!! If the acid levels are too low in an item, they WILL grow bacteria EVEN IF YOU SEAL THEM IN A WATER BATH. Please take care.

      • Drew – Thank you for your concern.

        This recipe came directly from the pectin package I used to make the jam, and is generally considered safe for canning. However, I do think that it is important for others to double check for safe recipes and ingredients while canning.

  8. Elizabeth F. says:

    Thanks for the tips. I have been interested in canning for a while.

  9. Joy says:

    Those look wonderful. I have never tried plum jam, I can’t wait to try this.

  10. Jen…this sounds wonderful! It would make me SO happy to see those little jars lined up in my pantry!

  11. My absolute favourite. Definitely on my “must try” list this summer!

  12. Margaret says:

    My plum tree if full! I have made four batches of jam and now I am preparing the fruit and freezing it in zip-lock freezer bags. At Christmas I always wish I had made more jam. This year I will have the fruit ready for fresh jam. The beautiful red color is perfect for the holidays.

  13. Kitchenfairy says:

    I made plumb jelly for the first time tonite.. I added son vanilla, cinnamon and ground clove.. It turned out awesome!! It’s gonna make great Xmas presents!! Thank u for your recipe!

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